The Chronicles Of Grant County

Faywood After It Became Faywood

faywood desert sunrise yucca mike lewinski december 19 2015 65A yucca stood tall during a desert sunrise in Faywood. (The photograph was provided through Flickr by Mike Lewinski, December 19, 2015.)

A yucca stood tall during a desert sunrise in Faywood. (The photograph was provided through Flickr by Mike Lewinski, December 19, 2015.)

On February 28, 1900, The Las Vegas Daily Optic reported that "T. C. McDermott of Edgerton, Minnesota, was the recent purchaser of the equity of the personal property of the Hudson Hot Springs and sanitarium company down in Grant County."

About a week later, on March 7, 1900, the Santa Fe New Mexican included a news article on its front page that stated that "The Casa del Consuelo at Hudson Hot Springs, Grant County, has been reopened by T. C. McDermott...He has Chicago and Minnesota capitalists interested with him in the Hudson springs property, and will make it one of the leading resorts of the southwest..." In the Spanish language, "Casa del Consuelo" is translated to "House of Comfort" in the English language.

A few months later, on July 27, 1900, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported that "The name of the hotel Casa del Consuelo at Hudson Hot Springs has been changed by Manager McDermott to 'Faywood' and will be so known in the future."

The name "Faywood" came from the names of two of the three founders of the Faywood Hot Springs. In addition to Mr. McDermott, J. C. FAY and William LockWOOD (emphasizes added) were the owners of this lodging property.

The name of the local rail station on the Santa Fe Railroad was changed from "Hudson" to "Faywood," according to a news article dated November 22, 1900, in the Albuquerque Journal. The next day, the same newspaper noted that in addition to the name change at the rail station, "...the Hot Springs are hereafter to be known as Faywood Hot Springs."

The name of the community surrounding the hot springs, as noted in a previous edition of The Chronicles Of Grant County, has varied through the years. In many cases, a community's name is the same as the same of its post office. A document from the Post Office Department of the United States, provided courtesy of The U S National Archives and Records Administration, confirmed that the name of the post office for this community was changed from "Hudson" to "Faywood" in 1901.

Another document from the Post Office Department, this one dated November 12, 1903, indicated that "Faywood" was also known as "Faywood Hot Springs." On September 23, 1915, the Post Office Department indicated in a document that the Faywood Post Office was still also known as the "Faywood Springs Post Office." A document from the Post Office Department, dated March 11, 1949, detailed a move of the post office to a site 10.3 miles northeast from its current site to what was then called "Dwyer."

This second location within today's Faywood had had its own individual post office previously with different names. On October 22, 1894, the Post Office Department indicated in a document that a post office was proposed for Dwyer, New Mexico. On May 29, 1901, a document from the Post Office Department noted the Dwyer Post Office was also known as the "St. [San] Jose" Post Office. The same document indicated that the Dwyer Post Office was located 9 miles north from the Faywood Post Office. On July 6, 1917, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported that an announcement had been made that the post office at Dwyer had been closed.

Advancements in communications began at the turn of the last century when plans were announced that a telephone line would be installed between Faywood and Deming, according to a news article dated October 19, 1901, in The Deming Headlight.

Humans weren't the only ones who benefitted from the hot springs at Faywood. The Albuquerque Evening Citizen, on May 19, 1906, detailed how Mrs. T. C. McDermott, the wife of the proprietor of the Faywood Hotel, was "...an enthusiastic poultry raiser. She raised over 800 chickens last year and an equally large number this year...An average of 1,000 eggs a week are gathered from this ideal chicken farm..."

A news article dated January 1, 1952, in the same newspaper indicated that the Faywood Hotel was demolished "recently." Reports from various sources indicated that the lodging facilities had been in decline for a number of years.

Ownership of the land changed through the years, with new owners updating and enhancing resort operations starting in the 1990s.

faywood san jose mission larry buck new mexican photographer flickr may 20 2019 25The San Jose Roman Catholic Mission Church is located in Faywood. According to a statement from the Diocese of Las Cruces, this is a mission of the Infant Jesus Roman Catholic Church of Hurley. (The photo was provided courtesy of Larry Buck, New Mexican Photographer, through Flickr, May 20, 2019.)

faywood faywood hot springs july 12 2008 flickr joseph pavlicA pool at the Faywood Hot Springs. (The photograph was provided courtesy of Joseph Pavlic through Flickr, July 12 2008.)

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