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Editorial

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Reports Point to Green Agenda Demands Holding Up Coronavirus Assistance Bill

Albuquerque – Journalists and organizations in Washington, D.C. are reporting the measure to offer Americans relief from Coronavirus is being held up in part because of demands for solar and wind tax credits. Despite the fact these giveaways to the eco-left have nothing to do with fighting the worldwide pandemic, they are reportedly part of the proposal put forth by leaders in the House.

To date, New Mexico’s three members of the House of Representatives have not commented on the inclusion of the green demands in the coronavirus relief bill.

https://errorsofenchantment.com/were-living-the-green-new-deal-right-now/?utm_source=Rio+Grande+Foundation&utm_campaign=633ccd5fe8-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_aa45c68eb3-633ccd5fe8-22764673&mc_cid=633ccd5fe8&mc_eid=1f306b5229

BY PAUL GESSING of the Rio Grande Foundation

Imagine massive reductions in vehicle traffic. esypv7zueaamoo1Massive reductions in vehicle traffic as this photo of “The 405” during a recent “rush hour” in Los Angeles illustrates.

maxresdefaultMassive declines in air travel as flights are canceled and people refrain from air travel.

By Paul Gessing

Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham and Taxation and Revenue Department Secretary Stephanie Schardin Clarke announced Friday that New Mexicans will have an extra 90 days to file and pay their 2019 personal income taxes in recognition of the economic hardships many are facing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Taxpayers will have until July 15 to file and pay any taxes due.

The Rio Grande Foundation commends the Governor for making this move.

As our state settles in to fight the Coronavirus, New Mexico’s energy workers are delivering what the radical environmental community never will: results.

You’re fracking welcome.

No doubt families are a little unsettled as they begin to cope with the household needs of an unexpected three-week-long Spring Break. Like many parents, I’m wondering how I am going to keep my children productively occupied while trying to maintain “social distancing” from the rest of the world. Judging by the calm chaos at my local grocery store, we all are there trying to stock up on items we think we’ll need to get through the next uncertain weeks.

By James Jimenez

We all benefit when New Mexico’s classrooms have the resources they need to educate our children. After all, today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders, entrepreneurs, and workforce. But our educational outcomes are not what they should be, and part of the reason is that we’ve underfunded our schools for years.

Some of the money that supports New Mexico’s education system comes from royalties and rental payments paid by the oil and natural gas industries. Because we understand how fortunate we are to have those natural resources, we tend to forget our responsibility to be the very best stewards of them that we can be. We must ensure that we’re not shortchanging our students – but, because of the federal government’s outdated policies, we are.

The political world took notice last week as they watched Michael Bloomberg’s less-than-stellar debate performance. The former New York City mayor was skewered by the other candidates and we wonder if the New Mexico politicians who have championed Bloomberg, and his money, are feeling a little awkward today.

Many new Mexicans are surprised to learn how the former mayor of New York City and the 9th richest person in the United States spreads millions across the Land of Enchantment. After the surprise, they become angry because they see how Bloomberg is using that money to impose his radical agenda on New Mexico.

By Paul J. Gessing

When the 2018 election results were tallied and it was clear that New Mexico had moved into the “progressive blue state” category, it was destined to be a tough couple of years for fiscal conservatives. The 2019 (last year’s) session was indeed the worst we’ve seen. The just-completed 30 day session was not quite as bad, but again needed economic reforms took a back seat to round 2 of the Legislature’s spending binge.

Thanks to the oil boom still going on in the Permian Basin, New Mexico’s general fund has grown to $7.6 billion. That’s up from $6.3 billion when Susana Martinez left office at the start of 2019, a 20% increase in just two years.

Unconstitutional legislation was ramrodded through Session without proper discourse

Albuquerque, February 14--Last night's New Mexico House passage of SB5, known as the Red Flag bill, is the latest example of how left-leaning Democrats are tearing away at the fabric of our great state. By a vote of 39-31, the House snatched away New Mexicans' Constitutional rights. This legislation, allowing authorities to confiscate firearms if they feel a homeowner may be a threat to himself or others, clearly violates peoples' 2nd Amendment rights, due process and search and seizure protocol. The bill is essentially a progressive Democrats' gun grab.

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New classified for Silver City church seeking office manager.

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