THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW

1. ALBUQUERQUE SHATTERS HOMICIDE RECORD FOR ONE YEAR

More violence erupted in Albuquerque this week, and the city saw its 74th murder in 2019. That breaks the previous record of 72 in 2017. This dubious distinction follows Democrat Mayor Tim Keller’s pledge two years ago to end this rash of violence that’s plagued the city for years. Keller says his Administration is devoted to public safety, but he admits violent crime in Albuquerque is rising.

The soaring murder rate has put a blemish on Albuquerque and tarnished the city’s reputation. USA TODAY's website recently ranked the Duke City 11th on a list of the nation’s most dangerous cities.

The escalating violent crime is a sign of ineffective leadership by Mayor Tim Keller, who continues to look for ways to stop the crisis.

From KOB:


2. NEW NATIONAL STUDY ON FRACKING SHOWS A BAN WOULD
DEVASTATE NEW MEXICO'S ECONOMY

The head of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global Energy Institute has unveiled the results of a new study that show a ban on fracking would severely damage New Mexico’s livelihood. The study reveals that 27,000 jobs would be lost in New Mexico, and the state’s economy would be impacted by $7 billion in just the first year if fracking is stopped.

The findings come as Democratic presidential candidates have pledged to end fracking. New Mexico’s multi-billion dollar oil and gas industry provides big revenues that fund public education and other vital government programs.

Here's the story:

3. PENSION TENSION COMING TO THE ROUNDHOUSE

Here’s something that’s scary.

Gov. Lujan Grisham is already endorsing a plan that looks to endanger pension security for hard-working New Mexicans.

She’s getting backlash (and rightly so) over a so-called profit-sharing proposal to tie future cost-of-living increases on retirement payouts to investment returns for the $16 billion retirement fund overseen by the Public Employees Retirement Association.

In addition, Lujan Grisham wants to fix the long-time broken pension system by increasing contributions for public workers by an additional 4% --split evenly between employees and taxpayers. Yeah, make them pay for past years’ irresponsible actions!

New Mexico has an unfunded pension liability now of more than $6 billion. This is affecting the state’s credit rating and puts New Mexico on shaky financial ground.

Some are already fuming:

IN OTHER BRIEFS:

OIL AND GAS REVENUES TO SPUR DEBATE

State lawmakers are poised to debate how to spend or save more than a billion dollar windfall from oil and gas revenues. Democrats will look to spend the revenues on schools and other state programs. But some Republicans caution part of that revenue should be set aside for a rainy day.


GOVERNOR OFFERS “RAPID-HIRE” EVENT TO FILL STATE VACANCIES

Starting tomorrow the state will hold a 4-day job fair in Albuquerque to try to fill hundreds of vacant state jobs. The new workers would add tens of millions of dollars on the backs of New Mexico taxpayers. Is adding more bureaucracy to state government in Santa Fe really needed?

NEW MEXICO SHINES BRIGHT IN WASHINGTON

New Mexicans and Washington dignitaries lit the U.S. Capitol Christmas tree this past week. The 60-foot blue spruce came from Carson National Forest near Red River. The tree features 10,000 ornaments made by children from New Mexico.