This column will feature items that relate somehow to Grant County - the name of a street in the case of the first one, and maybe other streets, or the name of a building or whatever catches the fancy of the contributor, Richard Donough. Readers are encouraged to send him topics of interest to them, so he can do the research and write an article.

Pinos Altos When It Was Pino Alto

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Pinos Altos When It Was Pino Alto

pinos altos steve douglas flickr january 20 2013 50A winter scene in Pinos Altos. (The photo was provided courtesy of Steve Douglas through Flickr, January 20, 2013.)

Pinos Altos – "Tall Pines" in the Spanish language – was initially known by Spanish and Mexican coming through the area as "Pino Alto" – "Tall Pine." The name given to the area by the Apache people – the local folks who considered this home before settlement by outsiders – is not known.

On October 29, 1860, the Mesilla Times reported that a major gold discovery occurred at the "Pino Alto Mines." This, according to a letter to the editor that was published in the Santa-Fe Gazette on November 17, 1860. The news report indicated that there was "...gold in a branch of the Rio Gila [Gila River]...There is some difference of opinion as to what branch of the Gila the discovery was made upon, but, from our knowledge of the geography of the country, we think it is what is known on old Spanish maps, as the Rio San Joaquin, and more recently as the Rio Prieto."

Ten days earlier, the Daily National Democrat of Marysville, California, reported on the same dispatch from Mesilla; this dispatch was indicated that the initial news article was in published on the October 18th. "The amount of gold dust brought...is as follows: Second trip, $4,000; third trip, $1,500; fourth trip, $5,000; sixth trip, $1,000," according to the dispatch.

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Faywood After It Became Faywood

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Faywood After It Became Faywood

faywood desert sunrise yucca mike lewinski december 19 2015 65A yucca stood tall during a desert sunrise in Faywood. (The photograph was provided through Flickr by Mike Lewinski, December 19, 2015.)

A yucca stood tall during a desert sunrise in Faywood. (The photograph was provided through Flickr by Mike Lewinski, December 19, 2015.)

On February 28, 1900, The Las Vegas Daily Optic reported that "T. C. McDermott of Edgerton, Minnesota, was the recent purchaser of the equity of the personal property of the Hudson Hot Springs and sanitarium company down in Grant County."

About a week later, on March 7, 1900, the Santa Fe New Mexican included a news article on its front page that stated that "The Casa del Consuelo at Hudson Hot Springs, Grant County, has been reopened by T. C. McDermott...He has Chicago and Minnesota capitalists interested with him in the Hudson springs property, and will make it one of the leading resorts of the southwest..." In the Spanish language, "Casa del Consuelo" is translated to "House of Comfort" in the English language.

A few months later, on July 27, 1900, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported that "The name of the hotel Casa del Consuelo at Hudson Hot Springs has been changed by Manager McDermott to 'Faywood' and will be so known in the future."

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Faywood Before It Was Faywood

The Chronicles Of Grant County

faywood map 1909 usgs green circle"Warm Springs" (in the green circle) was one of the names given to what is now the Faywood area of Grant County. The Faywood Rail Station (not shown on this map) was located farther south in Luna County. (This map was provided courtesy of the United States Geological Survey, 1909.)

Natural hot springs brought people to a section of Grant County long before Grant County existed. Prior to the area becoming known as "Faywood," it was known by other names. Among them: "Warm Springs," "Hudson," "Hudson Hot Springs," and "Hudson's Hot Springs." At the time of settlement by people from outside the region, the Apache lived here and the land was still part of Doña Ana County. (This ground did not become Grant County until 1868.)

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Saint Lawrence – San Lorenzo

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Saint Lawrence – San Lorenzo

san lorenzo historic district new mexico historic preservation division national archives 1984 church three 50The San Lorenzo Roman Catholic Mission Church is seen to the left in this photograph. (The photo was provided courtesy of the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division and The U S National Archives and Records Administration, 1984.)

San Lorenzo in Grant County was named after Saint Lawrence. ("San Lorenzo" is "Saint Lawrence" in the Spanish language.) In a previous edition of The Chronicles Of Grant County, the history of the town was detailed. In this edition, the story of Saint Lawrence – the man – is recalled so that local folks may also know that aspect of history.

Few people might think of saints as comedians, yet Lawrence showed humor in the face of horror.

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San Lorenzo Historic District

The Chronicles Of Grant County

San Lorenzo Historic District

san lorenzo historic district new mexico historic preservation division national archives 1987 oneThis photograph is looking north across the Mimbres Valley towards the San Lorenzo Historic District. (The photograph was provided courtesy of the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division and The U S National Archives and Records Administration, 1987.)

In 1987, the State of New Mexico and local folks asked the Federal government to designate much of San Lorenzo as an historic district. The U S government agreed and the San Lorenzo Historic District was created in 1988.

The District includes lands along "...the west side of Galaz Street and two blocks east of Galaz [Street] from one-half block south of G Street to one-half block north of D Street," according to the Nomination Form for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places submitted by the State of New Mexico Historic Preservation Division.

"Nearly all buildings in the District are constructed of adobe walls and corrugated metal roofs and fall into the New Mexico Vernacular category," the Nomination Form detailed. "...N. Y. Ancheta established San Lorenzo in 1869. Ancheta was originally from Sonora and most of the other settlers [then from Pinos Altos] were [originally] from the State of Chihuahua. They dug an irrigation ditch that first year to water this the widest portion of the Mimbres Valley. The village was located just above the irrigation ditch, beside the most desirable location in the valley…The linear organization of the settlement along Galaz Street is typical of many, if not most, Hispanic farming villages of the period in northern Mexico and Hispanic New Mexico."

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San Lorenzo

The Chronicles Of Grant County

san lorenzo steve douglas december 16 2012 65san lorenzo steve douglas december 16 2012 65San Lorenzo is a rural community in eastern Grant County. "The Mimbres River is behind the tree line and Acklin Hill is in the background," according to the caption for this photograph of San Lorenzo. (The photograph was provided through Flickr by Steve Douglas, December 16, 2012.) [Editor's Note: The editor manipulated this photo to get rid of the over saturation and unreal colors.]

San Lorenzo is a small community located in eastern Grant County. The community's name is the Spanish wording for "Saint Lawrence." Prior to the community's establishment, this area was part of the Apache Nation.

Approximately eighty acres of land in the area are included in the San Lorenzo Historic District. The Nomination Form for San Lorenzo to be considered for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places, a form submitted on September 10, 1987, by the State of New Mexico, stated that "The mining towns of Pinos Altos and Silver City, established in the early 1860s, are the only permanent settlements in Grant County which predate the occupation of the Mimbres Valley in 1869 and 1870."

According to the Nomination Form, San Lorenzo was founded by a group of nineteen miners and their families from Pinos Altos in 1869. At that time, the Nomination Form stated that an irrigation ditch was built and farming began here in the upper Mimbres Valley. "Corn, potatoes and vegetables were the first major food stuffs," according to this document. "Hay and alfalfa were widely grown for livestock to supplement the gramma grass of the surrounding hills. Apples, peaches, grapes and other fruit began to be planted in the early 1870s."

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Scholarships – Part Four

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Scholarships – Part Four

scholarships part four

One of the largest sources of scholarships in the United States are scholarships provided by the Federal government to students receiving an education at the U S military service academies. Young people who are American citizens living in Grant County may want to consider these educational opportunities. Congressional nominations as well as nominations by the Vice President of the U S are required for consideration to be admitted to three of the five military service academies: the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York; the United States Air Force Academy, north of Colorado Springs, Colorado; and the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Congressional nominations are required for consideration to be admitted to the U S Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York. The U S Coast Guard Academy, located in New London, Connecticut, does not require congressional nominations or nominations from the Vice President as part of its admissions process.

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2020 Census Part Three

The Chronicles Of Grant County

2020 Census
Part Three

grant county municipalities usgs 2021 3 50This map shows the location of a number of communities in Grant County. Seven of the eighteen census designated places are circled in green. (The image was provided courtesy of the United States Geological Survey, 2021.)

In earlier editions of The Chronicles Of Grant County, information from the 2020 Census was detailed for Grant County overall as well as for each of the four individual incorporated communities within Grant County. This edition focuses on the eighteen census designated places (CDP) in the County. These places include unincorporated lands that have been grouped together by the U S Census Bureau.

All statistics listed in this news column for 2020 are from the U S Census Bureau as of April 1, 2020; stats for 2010 are from the same source as of April 1, 2010.

The population in eleven of these CDPs decreased from 2010 to 2020, while the number of residents increased in five of these CDPs during that ten-year period. Two CDPs had no change in the number of people living in those communities from 2010 to 2020.

The Arenas Valley CDP saw its population decrease from 1,522 persons in 2010 to 1,291 residents in 2020; this was a decrease of 15.2% during the ten-year period. The population of the Buckhorn CDP went from 200 persons in 2010 to 172 people in 2020; this was a decrease of 14.0% from 2010 to 2020.

There was a 3.1% decrease in the population of the Cliff CDP from 2010 to 2020; 293 residents lived here in 2010, 284 people lived here in 2020. Seventeen people lived in the Cobre CDP in 2020, while 39 residents were in that community in 2010; this represented a 56.4% decrease in population in this ten-year period.

The population of the Gila CDP decreased from 314 people in 2010 to 285 persons in 2020 – a 9.2% decrease in number of residents during the ten-year period. The Hanover CDP saw its population decrease from 167 residents in 2010 to 144 persons in 2020; this represented a 13.8% decrease from 2010 to 2020.

The Lake Roberts Heights CDP saw its population decrease from 32 persons in 2010 to 22 people in 2020; the percentage decrease was 31.2% during this ten-year period. The population of the Mimbres CDP decreased from 667 people in 2010 to 390 people in 2020; the decrease was 41.5% from 2010 to 2020.

There was a 19.3% decrease in the number of residents living in the North Hurley CDP from 2010 to 2020. Three hundred people lived in this community in 2010, while 242 persons resided here in 2020. The Rosedale CDP saw its population decrease from 394 people in 2010 to 377 residents in 2020; this represented a 4.3% decrease during the ten-year period. Seven people lived in the Trout Valley CDP in 2020, while sixteen persons lived in this CDP in 2010 – a 56.2% decrease in number of residents during the ten-year period.

Fifty-two people lived in the Hachita CDP in 2020, while 49 residents were in this community in 2010; this represented a 6.1% increase during the ten-year period. The Piños Altos CDP saw its population increase from 198 persons in 2010 to 225 residents in 2020; this was an increase of 13.6% during the ten-year period.

An increase of 52.6% during the ten-year period took place in the San Lorenzo CDP as its population grew from 97 persons in 2010 to 148 people in 2020. The population of the Tyrone CDP went from 637 persons in 2010 to 712 people in 2020; this was an increase of 11.8% from 2010 to 2020. The White Signal CDP increased its population from 181 in 2010 to 191 in 2020; the additional ten residents represented a 5.5% increase during the ten-year period.

The population of Faywood CDP remained at 33 people in both 2010 and 2020. In the Lake Roberts CDP, the number of residents was 53 persons in both 2010 and 2020.

To put these statistics into perspective, the overall population of the U S increased 7.4% from 2010 to 2020, and the population of the State of New Mexico increased 2.8% during the same ten-year period.

The U S Census Bureau does not use "Hispanic" as a racial classification. Instead, the Federal government uses the wording "Hispanic or Latino" as an ethnicity. The percentage of the population that self-identified as Hispanic or Latino for their ethnicity varied in these CDPs in 2020.

In the Arenas Valley CDP, the percentage in 2020 was 48.0%; in the Buckhorn CDP, 7.6%; in the Cliff CDP, 9.5%; in the Cobre CDP, 94.1%; in the Faywood CDP, 66.7%; in the Gila CDP, 21.4%; in the Hachita CDP, 23.1%; in the Hanover CDP, 70.1%; in the Lake Roberts CDP, 22.6%; in the Lake Roberts Heights CDP, 45.5%; in the Mimbres CDP, 24.1%; in the North Hurley CDP, 83.1%; in the Piños Altos CDP, 15.6%; in the Rosedale CDP, 41.4%; in the San Lorenzo CDP, 62.2%; in the Trout Valley CDP, 14.3%; in the Tyrone CDP, 41.2%; and in the White Signal CDP, 20.4%.

Throughout New Mexico, the percentage of residents that self-identified as Hispanic or Latino was 47.7% in 2020. This represented an increase in this group of 6.0% statewide from 2010 to 2020. Throughout the U S, individuals that self-identified as Hispanic or Latino increased 23.0% during the same ten-year period. Individuals who were in this group represented 18.7% of the overall population – 62,080,044 persons – of the country.

Do you have questions about communities in Grant County?

A street name? A building?

Your questions may be used in a future news column.

Contact Richard McDonough at chroniclesofgrantcounty@mail.com.

If your email does not go through, please contact editor@grantcountybeat.com.

© 2021 Richard McDonough

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