The Chronicles of Grant County

This column will feature items that relate somehow to Grant County - the name of a street in the case of the first one, and maybe other streets, or the name of a building or whatever catches the fancy of the contributor, Richard Donough. Readers are encouraged to send him topics of interest to them, so he can do the research and write an article.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

fawn diane616 from pixabay 2014A fawn on the edge of woods. (The photograph was provided courtesy of diane616 through PIxabay, 2014)

Three roadways north of Silver City get their names from animals found in the wild. Fawn Court is named after young deer, Lynx Lane is named after the animal, and Wildcat Trail is named after wild cats like the lynx. These streets are located off of Old Little Walnut Road.

Deer are among the wildlife found in Grant County. Just north of this housing area is the Gila National Forest where deer can be seen in their natural habitat. In a news release from June 3, 2019, (a news release as valid today as when issued by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish): "Please remember – young wildlife that people discover are simply hiding while awaiting their parents' return from foraging nearby."

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Rio De Arenas and Arenas Valley

arenas valley steve douglas march 1 2010Arenas Valley has also been known as "Whiskey Creek." (The photograph was provided courtesy of Steve Douglas, March 1, 2010.)

Arenas Valley is named after the Rio de Arenas – the "River of Sands." This local stream is also known as "Whiskey Creek." According to a news article dated March 22, 1912, in the El Paso Herald, the stream was originally named the "Rio de Arenas" by "...Spanish and Mexican settlers because of a large body of sand north of where the old Santa Fe road crossed the valley." That valley then became known as "Arenas Valley."

The Chronicles Of Grant County

april fools image 2021

Yes, this is an April Fools Day news column. Happy reading.

No, there are no current plans by President Joseph Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to move 94,198 people into Grant County.

But this news column is based on a number of facts.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

Grant County Population Set To Grow – More
Than 94,000 New Residents Coming To Grant County

ground hog mine map usgs april fools 50The marker indicates the location of the new community of San Jose to be the home (perhaps temporarily) of 55,000 of the more than 94,000 new residents in Grant County. (This map was provided courtesy of the United States Geological Survey.)

Joseph Biden – as a candidate for President – made a number of promises when he ran for office in 2020. Now, as President, Mr. Biden is in the process of implementing those promises into actions.

Two of his key policies – immigration reform and planning for climate change – are being blended together. Just last week, the first signs of the implementation were announced publicly when the President appointed Vice President Kamala Harris to supervise border operations.

What was not reported at that time was that part of the planned solution to the border crisis will involve moving more than 94,000 new residents into Grant County. This influx will quadruple the current population of the County, estimated to be less than 30,000 people.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

chukar stephen d from pixabay 25This image of a Chukar was provided courtesy of Stephen D through Pixabay.

Four roadways just outside of the borders of the Town of Silver City are named after game birds. Bob White Drive, Chukar Road, Partridge Avenue, and Pheasant Drive are each located off of Ridge Road. Bob Whites, Chukars, Partridges, and Pheasants are types of birds.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

saint patricks day tumisu from pixabay 25This image was provided courtesy of Tumisu through Pixabay.

Can you imagine Silver City and other communities in Grant County festooned with green ribbons?

Today – Saint Patrick's Day – might be the day to re-invent a tradition that local residents practiced in the early days of Silver City.

Green ribbons (and other decorations in the color of green) have been used throughout the world to celebrate the anniversary of the death of a man who has become synonymous with the life of Ireland. The Liverpool Mercury, a newspaper serving that city in England, reported on March 21, 1828, that Saint Patrick's Day was celebrated on March 17th that year "...in a more than usual brilliant manner..." with, among other items, green ribbons.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

gila wilderness steve douglas flickr asterisk97 november 18 2012This photograph shows the Gila River as it flows through the Gila Wilderness. The Apache Nation once included lands throughout Grant County as well as other areas of what is today the Southwest of the United States as well as northern Mexico. (This photo was provided through Flickr courtesy of Steve Douglas, November 18, 2012.)

When describing people from a different culture, individuals sometimes use words that seem innocuous or pleasant to themselves. Yet those same words may be used purposely to bring pain to others and may be considered offensive to the individuals from that different culture.

The Chronicles Of Grant County

covid 19 new mexico health department february 22 2021This graph shows the relative levels of deaths from COVID-19 Disease among five major racial/ethnic groups within the State of New Mexico. The yellow line represents the number of COVID-19 deaths among Hispanic Americans in New Mexico, the green line represents the number of COVID-19 deaths among Non-Hispanic White Americans in New Mexico, and the blue line represents the number of COVID-19 deaths among Native Americans in New Mexico. The gray line, representing the number of COVID-19 deaths among Non-Hispanic Black Americans in New Mexico, and the orange line, representing the number of COVID-19 deaths among Americans of Asian and Pacific Island heritage in New Mexico, overlap one another for many months in this graph.  (This graph was provided courtesy of the New Mexico Department of Health, 2021.

 


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PDF - New Mexico Department of Health - Image of Relative Levels of Deaths - COVID-19 Pandemic

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